The Hippodrome’s new class dives into Shakespeare

By DANIELA ESTEVES

David Patrick Ford’s The Shakespeare Code acting class

Six courses | $149

Classes start Sept. 11, 2017,  6:15 p.m. ‑  7:30 p.m.

A seventh class on Oct. 24 is an optional end of term celebration.


We at the Hipp know Shakespeare isn’t always easy. Even the most talented of actors have trouble understanding the complexity of the language and the intentions and emotions in between the lines. The Shakespeare Code with David Patrick Ford at the Hippodrome Theatre is a course that allows the public to delve into the genius mind of this classic writer.

The goal of the class is to enlighten students to the brilliance of Shakespeare’s writing and reveal how his texts are master classes in acting technique.  Aspiring actors will learn new techniques in text analysis and will gain confidence in their acting through the knowledge that they are accurately interpreting and portraying their characters.  Fans of Shakespeare’s writing will come to see the plays through the eyes of the actor — the artist for which the plays were written — and their appreciation of the writing will deepen.

Students will break down some of Shakespeare’s most famous text by analyzing one line at a time, looking for clues such as deviations in the meter and use of imagery, identifying themes that run throughout the plays, finding the instructions for movement and stage pictures written into the text and more.

This course is intended for actors who wish to understand how to perform Shakespeare at a higher level, for students who want a better understanding of the reason why Shakespeare’s plays are so enduring, and for lovers of Shakespeare’s texts who want to see them from an actor’s perspective.  An acting background is not necessary.

About Hipp company member David Patrick Ford: This talented actor studied classical theater at the Conservatory of Drama at Carnegie Mellon University. His professional Shakespeare performance experience includes the roles Macbeth in Macbeth, Iago in Othello, and Antonio in The Merchant of Venice.

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